PRC, Inc.

"Noah's Ark" Prehistoric Sites Exhibit Botanical Remains During Transition from Stone Age to Advent of Farming

LogoArchaeologist reports prehistoric sites on Mount Ararat in Turkey exhibit assemblage of Epipaleolithic and Pre-Pottery Neolithic botanical remains with several surprises.

"Noah's Ark" Prehistoric Site Exhibits Ceramic Vessels at Entrance of Structure Showing Veneration for Thousands of Years

LogoArchaeologist reports that an entrance to a monumental wood structure on Mount Ararat in Turkey exhibits ceramic artifacts evidencing deposition of votive objects for millennia.

"Noah's Ark" Prehistoric Sites Exhibit Evidence for the Domestication of the Chickpea

LogoArchaeologist reports prehistoric sites on Mount Ararat in Turkey exhibit evidence for the domestication of the chickpea or garbanzo bean.

"Noah's Ark" Prehistoric Sites Exhibit Few Bone Remains and Much Animal Dung

LogoArchaeologist reports prehistoric sites on Mount Ararat in Turkey show few faunal remains but large amounts of animal coprolites in the interior rooms of a monumental wood structure.

"Noah's Ark" Prehistoric Sites Exhibit Advanced Carpentry Methods in Ancient Architecture

LogoHarvard University educated archaeologist and president of the archaeological contract firm PRC, Inc., Dr. Joel Klenck, reports that prehistoric sites on Mount Ararat in Turkey, associated with Noah’s Ark by several religious organizations, exhibit advanced wood joinery features that were previously unknown to exist during this period.

"Noah's Ark" Prehistoric Sites Exhibit Array of Ancient Stone Tools

LogoHarvard University educated archaeologist and president of the archaeological contract firm PRC, Inc., Dr. Joel Klenck, reports that prehistoric sites on Mount Ararat in Turkey, associated with Noah’s Ark by several religious organizations, exhibit an array of lithic or stone tools.

"Noah's Ark" Prehistoric Sites Exhibit Non-Ceramic Containers Before the Invention of Pottery

LogoArchaeologist reports prehistoric sites on Mount Ararat in Turkey exhibit containers made from organic material—precursors to the invention of pottery.

"Noah's Ark" Prehistoric Site Exhibits Possible Evidence for Metallurgy

LogoArchaeologist reports prehistoric site on Mount Ararat in Turkey exhibits no direct evidence for metal artifacts although a context on a decomposing wood wall might indicate residue from a copper or bronze artifact.

Archaeologist Responds to Attacks on Turkish Professors, Government Ministers, and Prehistoric Sites on Mount Ararat Associated with Noah's Ark

LogoHarvard University educated archaeologist and president of the archaeological contract firm PRC, Inc., Dr. Joel Klenck, defends the veracity of prehistoric sites and efforts by Turkish researchers and government ministers to protect archaeological sites on Mount Ararat in eastern Anatolia, associated with Biblical and Quranic accounts of Noah’s Ark.

Archaeologist Answers Why Prehistoric Sites Associated with Noah's Ark on Mount Ararat Were Recently Discovered

LogoFor centuries, the account of Noah’s Ark, a Biblical and Quranic account where an ancient family survived a worldwide deluge on a massive wood vessel and repopulated the globe, has fascinated explorers and religious adherents of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In 2009, a Chinese religious organization, Noah’s Ark Ministries, Inc., with a Kurdish guide, a Turkish geologist, archaeologist, and government ministers announced the discovery of the Ark of Noah. In 2011, Dr. Joel Klenck, a Harvard University educated archaeologist and current president of the archaeological contract firm PRC, Inc., confirmed the veracity of the site and its prehistoric origin during the Late Epipaleolithic Period (13,100 to 9,600 B.C.). In this report, the archaeologist opines why the discovery of prehistoric sites on Mount Ararat only occurred during the last decade.