PRC, Inc.

Joel Klenck Promoted to President of PRC, Inc.

Harvard University educated archaeologist and the former director of the Paleontological Research Corporation, Dr. Joel Klenck, has been promoted to president of the organization. Jason Sain, chief executive officer of PRC states, “Klenck has shown commitment and moxie growing a successful business. He is working on a wide variety of projects in both hemispheres covering periods from the end of the Stone Age through Early Medieval times. Moreover, PRC is pursuing an array of contracts involving private and government sponsored research.” Sain notes, “Having a comprehensive knowledge of faunal material, stone tools, pottery styles and architectural remains, his communication ability, survey skills and analytical prowess has made him indispensable to our organization and his promotion to president is well deserved.”

Bedouin Animal Sacrifice Rituals Provide Clues to Archaeological Remains

Modern animal sacrifice rituals practiced by Bedouin communities in the Levant provide insight to the deposition of remains at archaeological sites in the Near East.

Modern Sacrifice Rituals in the Levant Reveal Diversity of Beliefs

Harvard University educated anthropologist and president of the Paleontological Research Corporation, Dr. Joel Klenck, conducted a study of Bedouin sacrificial rituals that reveal a diversity of beliefs in Arab populations in the Levant. Sponsored by a grant from the Joe Alon Museum, Klenck conducted a study of Bedouin sacrificial rituals completed in 2012 and featured in a forthcoming publication.

Archaeologist: Reign of Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmose II Suggests Crisis

Harvard University educated archaeologist and president of the Paleontological Research Corporation, Dr. Joel Klenck, states an array of archaeological discoveries evidence a crisis during the reign of the Egyptian Pharaoh Thutmose II (ca. 1,492-1,479 B.C.) in the Eighteenth Dynasty. An inscription by the succeeding Pharaoh Hatshepsut (ca. 1,479-1,457 B.C.) in her Underground Temple at Speos Artemidos states that Egypt was “ruined” and “had gone to pieces” before the beginning of her reign. Hatshepsut’s inscription also states that a population of “vagabonds” emerged from former Asiatic populations that once controlled northern Egypt and caused this ruination. Hatshepsut notes these vagabonds were responsible for “overthrowing that which had been made”.

Archaeologists Excavate Puppy and Raven Skeletons in Bronze Age Temple Complex in Levant

Harvard University educated archaeologist and president of the Paleontological Research Corporation, Dr. Joel Klenck, states that recent archaeological discoveries are revealing new aspects of cult practices of ancient inhabitants in the Levant. At Tel-Haror, a site with strata dating to the Middle Bronze II period (1,800-1,550 B.C.), archaeologists led by Professor Eliezer Oren from Ben Gurion University excavated a temple complex with a “migdal” or tower temple. Here, Klenck directed the removal and excavated the skeletal remains of dozens of juvenile dogs, ravens and crows in various states of articulation. In 2011, the animal bone data was compared to the unique material assemblage at the site that includes serpent figurines, the upraised arm of a statuette, and a pentagram design in preparation for a forthcoming manuscript. Many of the puppies, ravens and crows surrounded a square altar with a mudbrick base several meters away from the main sanctuary. The populations at Tel-Haror buried human shaped clay figurines, small ceramic bowls and other artifacts with these dog and corvid bones. Klenck states, “Several of the more complete animal skeletons showed the heads of these animals were severely twisted. This evidence suggests that the inhabitants broke the necks of some of these animals before interring them in the temple complex.”

Archaeologists Discover Earliest Equestrian Bit

Archaeologists led by Professor Eliezer Oren from Ben Gurion University excavated an equid burial at Tel-Haror, an archaeological site located in the Levant with strata dating to the Middle Bronze IIB Period (1,750-1,650 B.C.). Here, archaeologists retrieved the earliest metal equestrian bit. Dr. Joel Klenck, a Harvard University educated archaeologist and president of the Paleontological Research Corporation, who presided over the analysis of the equid remains, states the burial is at the base of a dome-shaped structure. The southeastern wall of the burial edifice is overlaid by a thick mudbrick partition that surrounds a nearby temple complex. An archaeologist specializing in the analysis of faunal remains, Klenck notes the equid is a donkey as evidenced by foot bone measurements and traits on the grinding surfaces of its teeth. In 2011, the skeletal data from the donkey burial was compared to the material assemblage at the site in preparation for a forthcoming manuscript.

Archaeologist Counters Critics Mount Ararat Discovery Is a Prehistoric Site

Archaeologist reports discovery of large wood structure on Mount Ararat in Turkey is a prehistoric archaeological site and counters critics.

Archaeological Discoveries on Mount Ararat Confront Attacks and Bias

Archaeologist reports ancient sites on Mount Ararat in Turkey are being defamed and archaeologists harassed because of an alleged association with Noah’s ark.

New Support for Alleged Noah’s Ark Discovery

Archaeologist states there is scientific merit to recent discovery of site associated with the legendary ark of Noah.